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Quality Measures
 
Heart Attack Care
A heart attack, also called an acute myocardial infarction, occurs when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. When the heart muscle cannot get the oxygen and nutrients it needs, the part of the heart tissue that is affected may die. The symptoms of a heart attack can include chest pain (often described as a crushing, squeezing or burning pain in the center of the chest and may radiate to your arm or jaw), shortness of breath, dizziness or faintness, sweating, nausea, cold or clammy skin or a gray or very ill appearance. Sometimes there are no symptoms, especially if you have diabetes. Women sometimes have different symptoms, such as a different kind of chest pain and/or abdominal pain.

 


Heart attack patients receiving aspirin when arriving at the hospital. This measure reports what percent of heart attack patients receive aspirin within 24 hours before or after they arrive at the hospital. Aspirin is beneficial because it reduces the tendency of blood to clot in blood vessels of the heart and improves survival rates. Heart attack patients who receive a prescription for aspirin when being discharged from the hospital. This measure reports how often aspirin was prescribed to heart attack patients when they are leaving a hospital. Aspirin is beneficial because it reduces the tendency of blood to clot in blood vessels of the heart and improves survival rates. Heart attack patients who receive either a prescription for a medicine called an “ACE inhibitor” or a medicine called an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) when they are discharged from the hospital. This measure reports what percent of heart attack patients who have problems with the heart pumping enough blood to the body were prescribed medicines to improve the heart’s ability to pump blood. Heart attack patients who are given advice about stopping smoking while they are in the hospital. This measure reports what percent of adult heart attack patients are provided advice and/or counseling to quit smoking. Smoking harms the heart, lungs and blood vessels and makes existing heart disease worse Heart attack patients who have a medicine called a "beta blocker" prescribed when they are discharged from the hospital. This measure reports what percent of heart attack patients were prescribed a special type of medicine when leaving the hospital, that has been shown to reduce further heart damage. Heart attack patient with a clogged artery in the heart that is opened with a balloon therapy called PCI within 90 minutes of hospital arrival. This measure reports how quickly heart attack patients had a clogged artery in the heart opened with a balloon therapy called PCI to increase blood flow to the heart and reduce heart damage. Lack of blood supply to heart muscle can cause lasting heart damage. In certain types of heart attacks, a small balloon is threaded into a blood vessel in the heart to open up a clogged artery that keeps the blood from flowing to the heart muscle. It is important that this therapy be given quickly after a heart attack is diagnosed. Heart attack patients who receive a
prescription for a Statin medication at
discharge. This measure reports
what percentage of heart patients
who have problems with high
cholesterol were prescribed
medications to help reduce their
“bad” cholesterol