Screening Guidelines

Primary care providers recommend annual screenings for everyone to improve and maintain their quality of health. Be our partner in health care and manage your health today.

Breast cancer

Breast cancer

All women age 25 and older should have a formal risk assessment for breast cancer.

Women with an average risk of breast cancer should start annual screening mammograms at age 40.

Women with a higher-than-average risk of breast cancer should start annual screening mammograms at an earlier age and should be offered additional imaging each year.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer

Adults age 50-80 who have a 20 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years should be screened for lung cancer annually.

Screening is not required once a person has not smoked for 15 years or has a health problem that limits life.

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer

All adults age 50-75 should be screened for colorectal cancer. If you have a family history your screening may begin much earlier.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death for both men and women.

It is estimated that 10.5% of new colorectal cancer cases occur in persons younger than 50 years. If you are experiencing changes in bowel habits, blood, abdominal pain, etc. you should see your primary care provider.

In 2016, more than 25% of eligible adults in the U.S. had never been screened for colorectal cancer and in 2018, 31% were not up to date with screening.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer

Adult males age 55-69 should be screened for prostate cancer.

Diabetes

Diabetes

Adults age 40-70 who are overweight or obese should be screened for diabetes.

Adults who have a family history of diabetes.

Women who have a history of gestational diabetes.

Screening for abnormal blood glucose includes:

  • Eye
  • Foot
  • A1C/Blood sugar

Patients should take medications as prescribed by their doctors.

Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure

All adults age 18 or older should have a blood pressure screening.

Hypertension is a major contributing risk factor for heart failure, myocardial infarction, stroke and chronic kidney disease.

Patients should take medications as prescribed by their doctors.

Immunizations

COVID-19

Anyone over the age of 12 years old should get the vaccine to protect themselves from COVID-19.

Flu

Anyone 6 months or older should be vaccinated against the flu annually.

Pneumonia

All adults age 65 or older should receive a pneumonia vaccine, as should individuals age 2-64 with certain medical conditions and adults age 19-64 who smoke cigarettes.

Shingles

Adults age 50 and older should receive the two-dose series of the vaccine scheduled two to six months apart.

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